market in london

The Best Sustainable Eats in London

shutterstock_186036581(Market image via Shutterstock)

London is one of the most culturally diverse cities the world over. Not only does this bring an interesting mix of knowledge, languages and traditions, but it also allows for some serious eats from around the world. There are myriad eateries and markets to indulge yourself, which makes it a bit tricky when it comes to making choices.  We urge you to try some of these places that offer (delicious) sustainable, farm-to-table fare that’s good for you and the environment.

Borough Market

One of London’s biggest food markets amongst dozens, the aisles of local produce, breads, cheeses, meats, and pastries are guaranteed to inspire the foodie in all of us. You could spend hours here just wandering through the place, conversing with all the local artisans, never spend a single dime, and still leave full. That’s right — there are samples everywhere. The friendly atmosphere of the city of London reaches its peak here. You won’t know what to bite into next.

The Clerkenwell Kitchen

One of the trendier places on our list, Clerkenwell Kitchen has been serving locally sourced and sustainable food for years. Drawing clear inspiration from Alice Water’s Chez Panisse with her cookbooks decorating the interior, this restaurant is minimalist with its menu, which changes daily. Though traditionally English with items such as smoked trout and haddock, they fancy it up with additions like apricot and ricotta cheesecake with blood orange syrup.

The Duke of Cambridge

We can’t talk about London without talking about pubs. The Duke of Cambridge is an organic pub that recently partnered up with Riverford, a family-run farm famous for it’s organic vegetable boxes and farm shops. Everything they cook with (even the drinks) is sourced locally, and they maintain ethical practices for all: suppliers, staff, customers, and the planet. Their menu changes daily, but some recent gems include a pot roast pheasant and spicy chickpea cake with tomato raita.

Exmouth Market

Exmouth was my personal favorite location for street food fare, located in the London borough of Islington. This is where London’s diversity culminates. Walk down the street for two minutes and you’ll pass several different cultural cuisines, including Mexican, Indian, Italian, Argentinean, Bangladeshi, French, Japanese, and Ghanaian. My only regret is not having tried every single vendor, but you cannot go wrong with any food you ultimately decide on.

Feng Sushi 

London definitely isn’t short of good Asian fare. Feng Sushi is a Japanese delivery service with a few locations around the city, serving up seasonal and sustainably sourced sushi at a great value. It even comes in biodegradable packaging. Their website lists exactly where they get every product they use, here, and it’s terribly impressive to have a restaurant be that visible and honest about their sourcing. Their Temaki hand rolls are comparable to flower bouquets, but probably more delicious, and their seasonal menu currently features salmon in several ways.

Granger & Co.

Owned by Australia’s Bill Granger, this sustainable restaurant makes everyone who walks through feel at home. With trendy community dining, locally sourced ingredients, traditional Australian fare, and an impressive wine list, Granger & Co is easily the best spot in Notting Hill for brunch and dinner. I had the privilege to eat here twice, and have yet to find a better plate for scrambled eggs. If you’re up for serious indulgence, try the chocolate chip banana bread served with whipped cream cheese. I would go back to London just to eat here again.

 About the Writer

marina-150x150Marina is a student who finds most of her comfort in food and in cooking. She runs her own adventurous food blog, fondly called “Marinated” which you can explore at www.marinatedblog.com. While studying abroad in London, she realized that all she wants from life is to eat through all of the cities in the world and write about it. In between meals, Marina enjoys reading and writing poetry, playing her ukulele, and dreaming up the places she wants to travel to next. She’s currently finishing her degree in Writing, Literature, & Publishing at Emerson College and is pretending the future isn’t happening yet.

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